Materials

  • CCB Social Studies pages 86 - 93

Standards

Objectives

  • Identify the events and issues that led to the Civil War

  • Understand the advantages and disadvantages of the North and the South during the Civil War

  • Recognize how Reconstruction affected the South and the lives of newly freed African Americans

Key Concept

  • The Civil War began as an attempt to preserve the Union, but it ended with the abolition of slavery in the United States.

Vocabulary

Tier 2 secede
surrender
territory
Tier 3 abolitionist
poll tax
reconstruction
Test Words context
point of view

Evidence-Based Reading

  • Ask Questions: Before students begin each section, have them read the heading and write a specific question they think the section will answer. After they have read the lesson, have them trade their questions with a partner and answer each other’s questions. You may want to create questions as a class activity for the first section. (Possible questions: Why didn’t most of the North use slave labor? As the country grew, did new states and territories want to have slavery? How did the Union stay together with such a big difference of opinion?)

Research It

  • Locate Sources: Tell students that the US Civil War has been a popular topic for many writers, historians, and filmmakers. Demonstrate doing an online search for media on a Civil War topic, such as text of the Emancipation Proclamation. As students work on the activity, encourage them to share the sources they find in their online searches.

Writing Practice

  • Explain to student s that including factual evidence in their persuasive paragraphs strengthens their argument. Encourage them to use online or other resources to find facts that support their point of view.

Before Lesson

On the board, create two concept webs, one for the North and one for the South. Begin filling in the webs using what students remember from previous lessons about issues such as states’ rights, the balance of power in Congress, and the development of manufacturing and industry in the North. Tell them to continue their webs as they read about the problem of slavery and the events immediately preceding the Civil War.

Background

Point out that the Civil War was not only about slavery, but it was also about economic, political, and social divisions between the North and the South. Even though the North’s victory preserved the Union, it did not resolve these divisions. Explain that this lesson will examine how these divisions led to war and how the division continued during Reconstruction.

Guided Practice

  • The Problem of Slavery
    • Founding the Republican Party
  • The Civil War
    • The Battle of Gettysburg
  • Reconstruction

Core Skill

Locate Sources: Tell students that the US Civil War has been a popular topic for many writers, historians, and filmmakers. Demonstrate doing an online search for media on a Civil War topic, such as text of the Emancipation Proclamation. As students work on the activity, encourage them to share the sources they find in their online searches.

Recognize Persuasive Language: Have students compare their sentences and analyses with a partner’s. Invite volunteers to share their analyses with the class, explaining why they feel Douglass was or was not successful. Tell them to support their opinions with evidence from the text of the speech.

Recognize Persuasive Language: Analyze the Martin Luther King, Jr., speech with students and identify persuasive language. Then have students analyze the Nixon speech. Have them share and compare their ideas.

Extension

Question Structure: As students work on their questions for the various sections of the lesson, remind them of how questions are constructed: Most questions invert the order of the subject and verb; often this is done by adding some form of the verb do. (Did you go to the game last night? When does the game start?) The main exception is questions in which who is the subject. (Who is the team’s captain? Who scored the winning goal?) Check students’ questions to make sure they have structured them correctly.

Develop a Logical Argument: Have students modify their persuasive writing to make it into a speech .Tell them to use both logical and emotional arguments to defend their position. Encourage them to practice the speech several times in front of a mirror. Then invite volunteers to share their speeches with the class.

Lesson Review